Netherlands maintains second place world ranking pensions

Netherlands maintains second place world ranking pensions

Published on: 24 October 2016

The Dutch pension system is just like last year in second place in the world of pensions, but runs into the number 1: Denmark. Australia remains in third place. This is evidenced by the annual Global Pension Index Mercer consulting firm in the field of Health, Wealth, Career.

 

The Global Pension Index

The Global Pension Index compares pension systems in 27 countries worldwide and thus covers almost 60% of the world population. It looks at both government-funded and self-regulated pensions, but also for personal belongings and savings outside the pension system.

The index is based on three elements: future reliability, integrity and adequacy. Although the sustainability of the Dutch system has increased slightly, the degree to which our pensions guarantee a livable minimum wage (adequacy) fell slightly.

Netherlands and Denmark are the only countries with an A-grade: a first-class and powerful pension system performs well, is durable and reliable. However, the Global Pension Index points awarded to which the Dutch pension system could be improved, such as the promotion of employment of older workers.

 

Confidence fell in pension funds

The participants were asked Mercer how great their confidence in the pension funds. In more than a quarter of the Dutch confidence in their pension fund has declined in the past year. the trust has increased by only 7% of the Dutch. Bartjan Willenborg Mercer: "Almost every day you read in the media negative reports on the financial position of pension funds and reduce pension benefits. Dutch read so mostly what is not going well, but rarely hear what is going well. This gives them an increasingly negative image of the funds and declining confidence. "Participants indicated that their confidence will grow when they have a better understanding of their personal situation. "Make it easy for them by leaving them with the push of a button to see how much is in their pension pot", suggests Willenborg.

Read the full report.